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WEP cracking usually conjures up images of geeks with evil intent. But Humphrey Cheung recently attended an FBI demonstration that showed at least some law enforcement types not only know about the latest generation of tools but also how to use 'em.

Many of us hope that cell phones never get the go-ahead for in-flight use. But wireless Internet access while aloft is here and gaining momentum. Glenn Fleishman reports on his and others' Wi-Fi flights.

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Things seemed a little slow at the cellular industry's annual rite of spring. But it seems that there will be plenty more video content heading for your phones before you know it. The question is, will you be buying?

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It took awhile, but we managed to round up a few more wireless PDA products willing to be put to our wireless speed testing. This time, we have multiple PalmOS-based solutions as well as Dell's fastest PDA for your perusal. We're sure you'll find the results as interesting as we did!

Ever wonder if the extra money you pay for an "enterprise" access point is buying the ability to handle heavier traffic loads than the $100-or-so AP on your local retailer's shelf? We did too until we put six 802.11g APs through some pretty heavy load testing, with some surprising results...

By now everyone has heard of wardriving, or maybe even Warflying. Wardrivers find wireless access points (WAPs) by driving around and using laptops with wireless cards. They typically track the WAPs using free and simple programs such as NetStumbler for Windows or Kismet for Linux.

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Updated PDA manufacturers have been previously caught "optimistically" specing both available memory and the number of screen colors really available in their products. This NeedToKnow shows that they also have some work to do to convey to prospective buyers the wireless speeds that their 802.11b-enabled products can really deliver. We found some surprisingly slow products, but also some that deliver what you'd expect from a device with WiFi inside.

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One of the wireless networking stories at this year's Las Vegas CES - aside from the scads of networkable DVD players and "media adapters" - was the battle for bragging rights to the highest throughput "starburst" number. (The "starburst" is the number prominently displayed on the front of a product's box).

In Part 1 of this NTK, I described the elements of Super-G and took a detailed look at normal 11g and Super-G channel overlap. I also presented test results pitting Super-G against "normal" 11g wireless LANs and "normal" 11g WLANs against each other.

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