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Wireless Reviews

Features and Admin

Multy X is a self-contained system that doesn't rely on a cloud service for system operation. It does, however, rely on a Zyxel-hosted relay service to enable the app to connect to the system any time the device running the app isn't directly connected to the Multy X's Wi-Fi.

Setup and management is via Android and iOS apps; there is no web GUI. I used the Android V1.4.1.171227 app for the review. My general impression of the app is that it is slow. I had instances where I stared at the startup screen for almost two minutes before the Home screen came up. Other times, the Home screen never came up; I just quit the app and tried later.

Zyxel Multy X startup screen

Zyxel Multy X startup screen

Once the app launches, you'll get the Home screen shown on the left below. Unlike most other Wi-Fi System apps, the speeds shown here are real-time throughput being used, instead of the results of the latest speed test from whatever Zyxel is using as a test server to the WAN side of the Multy X root node. The right screenshot shows the hamburger menu expanded.

Zyxel Multy X Home screen and menu

Zyxel Multy X Home screen and menu

The Diagnose, Parental Control and Setting screens available via the icons at the bottom of the screen are shown below.

Multy X app - Diagnose, Parental Control, Setttings screens

Multy X app - Diagnose, Parental Control, Setttings screens

Tapping the Diganose screen Start button runs checks of internet bandwidth to each node and node-to-node bandwidth. The screen below shows the node-to-node (backhaul) bandwidth is higher than my internet connection supports. The node-to-node bandwidth is higher than I measured in my testing, but the internet bandwidth measurements are spot on.

Multy X app - Diagnose results

Multy X app - Diagnose results

Multy X's feature set, summarized in the table below, is pretty minimal. Key points not to be missed are:

  • it doesn't support Ethernet backaul
  • it does support disabling the router to act as access points
  • it has no content filtering or QoS features
Features
# of Ethernet ports4
Max WAN Ports1
CPUQualcomm IPQ4019 quad -core
SwitchQCA8075
RAM (MB)512
Flash (MB)4096
FirmwareV1.00(ABKJ.3)C0
Cloud Service
N
Web Admin
N
DHCP Reserve
Y
Ethernet backhaul
N
AP Mode
Y
Wireless Bridge
Y
Wireless
System TypeExtender
# of Wi-Fi radios3
# of streams2
ClassAC3000
Wi-Fi Radio 12.4 GHz: In IPQ4019 + Skyworks SKY85809-11 Dual-band front end (x2)
Wi-Fi Radio 25 GHz: In IPQ4019 + Skyworks 85736-11 5 GHz Front End (x2)
Wi-Fi Radio 35 GHz: QCA9984 4x4 + Skyworks 85405-11 5 GHz power amp (x4)
Bluetooth RadioCSR8811
IoT Radion
FCC IDI88WSQ50
AntennaInternal
WPS
N
RADIUS
N
MU-MIMO
Y
Guest Network
Y
Band Steering
Y
AP Steering
Y
Roam Assist11kv
Notes- Has dedicated 5 GHz 4x4 backhaul radio
- Also has proprietary RSSI-based roam assistance
Firewall
Port Forward
Y
DMZ
Y
Content Filtering
N
Rogue Device Block
N
Threat Protection
N
Internet Pause
Y
User Accounts
Y
UPnP
Y
UPnP disable
Y
WAN
Static
Y
Dynamic
Y
PPPoE
Y
PPTP
N
L2TP
N
IPv6
N
QoS
Device Priority
N
Traffic Priority
N
DirectionN/A

At first glance, it looks like disabling internet access must be done device by device and is not schedulable. But adding a Group brings with it an internet access schedule for all devices assigned to that group.

Scheduling internet access by group

Scheduling internet access by group

Not in the table, but of note, is that a total of three nodes is currently supported (an extra Multy X node costs around $180), but both nodes must connect to the root node, i.e. multi-hop is not supported. Hidden away in the Private Network menu are the Wi-Fi settings, which include a switch to let you have different names for the 2.4 and 5 GHz networks.

The slideshow has more screenshots and commentary.

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