Like every other website on the planet, SmallNetBuilder uses cookies. Our cookies track login status, but we only allow admins to log in anyway, so those don't apply to you. Any other cookies you pick up during your visit come from advertisers, which we don't control.
If you continue to use the site, you agree to tolerate our use of cookies. Thank you!

Router Charts

Click for Router Charts

Router Ranker

Click for Router Ranker

NAS Charts

Click for NAS Charts

NAS Ranker

Click for NAS Ranker

More Tools

Click for More Tools

Wireless Reviews

Setup & Features

Since Lyra has both Android and iOS apps and a web interface, you can use either to set it up. Once you get the first node up, you can add more nodes via the app or by what appears to be a pushbutton Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS) session using a button on the bottom of each node. The only catch is you must pair each new node to the root (internet connected) node to add it. After that, however, you can move the node where you want it and it will change connection if needed.

Note the pushbutton can't be used to connect devices to the Lyra Trio network via WPS; I tried. The Windows 10 notebook I used said I could connect by pushing a button on the router—the usual indicator of support for a WPS pushbutton session. But when I tried, Windows told me it couldn't connect and that I'd have to enter the password instead.

Lyra does not rely on any cloud services to operate.

As noted earlier, Lyra Trio can use Ethernet as backhaul. Just set everything up first using wireless backhaul, then connect the desired nodes to Ethernet. You can also bypass Trio' NAT router and run the system as APs by choosing that mode in the Lyra App's Operation Mode screen (shown center below).

Lyra app screens

Lyra app screens

The other setting of note in the Lyra App is Remote Connection. This was there in the original review, but I didn't pay much attention to it. But with the number of router security exploits continuing to grow, I had to ask ASUS about it this time. They said it allows the app and app only to access the router remotely. To confirm, I used my trusty Fing app to scan the Trio's WAN connection for open ports and it did indeed come up with no ports exposed.

The Lyra review says there are no wireless controls in the web GUI found at 192.168.72.1 or router.asus.com if local DNS resolution is working correctly. But on a hunch, I tried the same URL used on all ASUSWRT routers and voila!

Lyra Trio hidden wireless settings

Lyra Trio hidden wireless settings

Mess with this stuff at your own risk. Remember, you're supposed to leave the Wi-Fi driving to the System in Wi-Fi systems.

The Trio's feature set is summarized in the tables below. The short story is Lyra Trio supports the same features as the original Lyra. More feature details can be found in the original Lyra review. Note there is no user manual, just a quick start guide.

Features
# of Ethernet ports2
Max WAN Ports1
CPUQualcomm QCA9563
SwitchQCA8334
RAM (MB)128
Flash (MB)32
Firmware3.0.0.4.382_20096-g2296ee7
Cloud Service
N
Web Admin
Y
DHCP Reserve
Y
Ethernet backhaul
Y
AP Mode
Y
Wireless Bridge
Y
Wireless
System TypeMesh
# of Wi-Fi radios2
# of streams3
ClassAC1750
Wi-Fi Radio 12.4 GHz: In QCA9563 + Skyworks SKY85330-11 2.4 GHz Front end (x3)
Wi-Fi Radio 25 GHz: QCA9980 + SKY85746-11 5 GHz front end [guess] (x3)
Wi-Fi Radio 3N/A
Bluetooth RadioAtheros AR3012 Bluetooth 4.0
IoT RadioN/A
FCC IDMSQ-RTACRW00
AntennaInternal
WPS
N
RADIUS
N
MU-MIMO
Y
Guest Network
Y
Band Steering
Y
AP Steering
Y
Roam Assist11kvr
Firewall
Port Forward
Y
DMZ
Y
Content Filtering
Y
Rogue Device Block
Y
Threat Protection
Y
Internet Pause
Y
User Accounts
Y
UPnP
Y
UPnP disable
Y
WAN
Static
Y
Dynamic
Y
PPPoE
Y
PPTP
Y
L2TP
Y
IPv6
Y
QoS
Device Priority
Y
Traffic Priority
N
DirectionBoth

Routing Performance

All performance tests were done with Android app 1.0.0.0.62 and 3.0.0.4.382_20096-g2296ee7 firmware using select tests from the Version 10 Router process.

The iperf3 WAN to LAN and LAN to WAN throughput tests came in at 817 and 919 Mbps, respectively, highlighted in the charts below. This was much better than the original Lyra (523 WAN>LAN, 541 LAN> WAN) in both directions.

Routing throughput - iperf3 method

Routing throughput - iperf3 method

I'll be comparing Lyra Trio with TP-Link Deco M5 and original Lyra from here on. I chose the TP-Link because it's cheaper and ranks higher than the Trio, even though it's a two-radio two stream design.

WAN to LAN testing using the tougher HTTP method benchmarks shows the Trio significantly outperforming the other two products with smaller filesizes, but the TP-Link jumping ahead with the two larger filesizes.

Routing throughput - HTTP Score comparison - WAN to LAN

Routing throughput - HTTP Score comparison - WAN to LAN
Plot key file size: [A] 2 KB, [B] 10 KB, [C] 108 KB and [D] 759 KB file

LAN to WAN shows a similar pattern, except the original Lyra outperforms the Deco in the largest filesize benchmark.

Routing throughput - HTTP Score comparison - LAN to WAN

Routing throughput - HTTP Score comparison - LAN to WAN

Wi-Fi Performance

Lyra Trio was run through our Wi-Fi System test process, letting it use whichever channels and bandwidth it chose. It used 2.4 GHz channel 5 and 5 GHz channel 149 for all three nodes. 80 MHz bandwidth was always used for 5 GHz, but the system appeared to alternate between using 20 and 40 MHz bandwidth for 2.4 GHz. This caused me to retest a few times, with the charted results reflecting 2.4 GHz 40 MHz bandwidth.

Here's what Lyra Trio looked like in the octoBox 18" test chamber.

Lyra Trio in test chamber

Lyra Trio in test chamber

Throughput vs. Attenuation (RvR)

The Rate vs. Range or RvR benchmarks look at how throughput varies with decreasing signal. This test is done on the root node, so is a best-case view and does not include any effects from backhaul links.

I sometimes have to add 9 dB of attenuation when running 2.4 GHz tests so that the octoScope Pal reference client's -30 dBm maximum recommended input level is not exceeded. This was the case with Lyra Trio, so 0 dB plotted for the Trio actually represents 9 dB attenuation. The other two products didn't require the additional 9dB.

The 2.4 GHz downlink plot shows original Lyra (MAP-AC2200) as the best of the group, with a curve significantly above the Trio. These rates reflect 40 MHz bandwidth use for all three products.

Throughput vs. Attenuation - 2.4 GHz downlink

Throughput vs. Attenuation - 2.4 GHz downlink

2.4 GHz uplink show Deco and Lyra starting out equally with Trio tracking well below. But as we move into mid to low signal levels after 24 dB of attenuation, the three track pretty closely.

Throughput vs. Attenuation - 2.4 GHz uplink

Throughput vs. Attenuation - 2.4 GHz uplink

5 GHz downlink shows Trio with the lowest peak throughput at the start of the curve. But Trio's throughput decline is less steep than the other two products' and it stays connected the longest.

Throughput vs. Attenuation - 5 GHz downlink

Throughput vs. Attenuation - 5 GHz downlink

Trio's throughput improved for 5 GHz uplink, easily beating the other two products. In all, the range of each Trio node shouldn't be too bad.

Throughput vs. Attenuation - 5 GHz uplink

Throughput vs. Attenuation - 5 GHz uplink

More Wireless

Zyxel logo

Wi-Fi Mesh System Secrets - Here's how to get the most out of your whole home mesh WiFi system.

Wi-Fi System Tools
Check out the new Wi-Fi System Charts, Ranker and Finder!

Featured Sponsors



Support Us!

If you like what we do and want to thank us, just buy something on Amazon. We'll get a small commission on anything you buy. Thanks!

Over In The Forums

I have an Asus 1900 running Merlin 384.5. No matter what PC or laptop I plug into it, it only negotiates 100 mbps. I cannot negotiate gb speeds. I am ...
There are plenty of reasons to change your AIM Mail or Gmail Mail password. You may suspect that your account has been hacked. You may want to change ...
There are plenty of reasons to change your AIM Mail or Gmail Mail password. You may suspect that your account has been hacked. You may want to change ...
There are plenty of reasons to change your AIM Mail or Gmail Mail password. You may suspect that your account has been hacked. You may want to change ...
There are plenty of reasons to change your AIM Mail or Gmail Mail password. You may suspect that your account has been hacked. You may want to change ...

Don't Miss These

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3