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Wi-Fi Router Charts

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Mesh System Charts

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DLNA/iTunes

I loaded the My Cloud test NAS with 6046 music tracks, 12467 pictures and 188 videos. The Twonky Version 7.2.3 server had no problems indexing them. I tested the server using my standard WDTV Live media streamer. Videos, music and photos all played back as expected.

Some NASes that I've tested have had problems playing photos. They also stream thumbnails that the NAS has generated, and those, as expected, pixelate when displayed full screen. I'm happy to report that the My Cloud didn't have that problem, and played only high resolution images.

The iTunes server also worked as expected. It appeared on both the Mac and Windows versions of iTunes. I did have one small issue that I've seen on other NASes: The iTunes server dropped offline once. I just restarted the server from within the UI and that solved the problem. The image below shows iTunes on my Mac playing back music from the My Cloud iTunes server.

iTunes playing music from the My Cloud iTunes Server

iTunes playing music from the My Cloud iTunes Server

Time Machine

I also tested the Time Machine backup feature. With Mac Backups enabled (by default) on the Settings General menu, the default volume for the backups is named TimeMachineBackup, but you can select any share. I mounted that volume using AFP and Time Machine on my Mac had no problem creating a backup.

Time Machine backup in progress using a sharre on the My Cloud NAS

Time Machine backup in progress using a sharre on the My Cloud NAS

My Cloud App

Testing Note: All testing on each platform for each app was performed both on my local network as well as a remote public access network. Thankfully, some restaurants are close to public Wi-Fi hotspots sponsored by local cable companies. The only real difference as compared to the LAN-based testing was the download/upload speeds. I didn't experience any connectivity issues.

For mobile devices, Western Digital supplies platform-specific apps. My Cloud, an application that provides access to your files and will play media from your My Cloud NAS on your mobile device, is available for iOS, Android and Windows Phone. WD Photos, a more robust application specifically designed to provide more options for viewing photos, is available only for iOS and Android.

After downloading and installing each of the apps from the respective stores, users can initially connect to the My Cloud NAS by logging in with the email that they used to register the WDMyCloud.com account. Or you can manually add your NAS using a 12-digit authorization code generated by the administrator.

The My Cloud app has a similar look and feel of the WD 2go app that Tim covered in his review. I installed the app on my Nexus tablet, Razr Maxx phone and iPad. The apps on all three platforms connected immediately to the My Cloud NAS. I also connected the app on the Nexus and the iPad to Dropbox. WD My Cloud also supports Google Drive and SkyDrive. It would be nice if WD had included support for additional cloud services such as iCloud and SugarSync.

The apps on the different platforms have a very similar look and feel. Of course, there will be some differences due to the differences in the mobile platform itself. For example, the My Cloud app has some additional write/copy features on the Android version that are not found in the iOS version. Users can upload from or directly to the SD card. Any file available on any of the devices (My Cloud, Dropbox, etc.) can be saved to the SD card. The image below shows the My Cloud landing page for both the Android (left) and iPad (right) platforms.

My Cloud app on Nexus 7 (left) and iPad (right)

My Cloud app on Nexus 7 (left) and iPad (right)

I played some music files on both platforms. Neither had a very fancy presentation. My Nexus 7 did, however, present me with a choice of music players installed on the device. In the screenshot below, I was playing the same song on both devices at the same time. There was about a 2 second difference in the play start times but both devices played the music properly.

My Cloud app playing music on Nexus 7 (left) and iPad (right)

My Cloud app playing music on Nexus 7 (left) and iPad (right)

Similarly, I was able to select multiple files and cut and paste from the My Cloud NAS to my Dropbox account. You'll note that there are some UI differences here. On the iPad, the selection boxes are in the left pane. On the Nexus 7, the boxes are in the right pane - mostly obscured by the Device popup box.

Select, cut and paste on Nexus 7 (left) and iPad (right)

Select, cut and paste on Nexus 7 (left) and iPad (right)

Of course there are differences due screen size. The image below shows the photo viewer in the My Cloud apps. The Android device (left) doesn't have a preview of the image like the iPad does. If you select the same image, the image immediately shows full screen. The iPad gives you a preview, which, if you click on it, goes to full screen. Both platforms support a slide show, and both let you choose "HD" which downloads the full size image.

My Cloud photo viewer on Nexus 7 (left) and iPad (right)
My Cloud photo viewer on Nexus 7 (left) and iPad (right)

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