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Items tagged with: WiFi

Linksys Wireless Signal Booster Review

Discontinued Jan 2004Signal amplifier for 2.4GHz wireless products. Handles two antennas. FCC certified and compatible with the Linksys Wireless Access Point (WAP11) and Wireless Access Point Router (BEFW11S4) only.

NeedToKnow: WiFi PDAs' Dirty Little Secret

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Updated PDA manufacturers have been previously caught "optimistically" specing both available memory and the number of screen colors really available in their products. This NeedToKnow shows that they also have some work to do to convey to prospective buyers the wireless speeds that their 802.11b-enabled products can really deliver. We found some surprisingly slow products, but also some that deliver what you'd expect from a device with WiFi inside.

NETGEAR WG602 54Mbps Wireless Access Point Review

Although NETGEAR was the first to launch the opening salvo in the tri-mode / dual-band wireless LAN wars, its WG602 54Mbps Wireless Access Point that it announced a few months ago represents the first-available draft-802.11g Access Point shipped by the company. It made its way into the SmallNetBuilder Test Lab pretty quickly, and our first-available review will give you our usual in-depth report.

Quick View: PCTEL WiFi Seeker

Pocket-sized WiFi network detectors may seem like a dumb idea at first. But if the size and features are right, they can be a real time-saver for seeing whether it's worth it to pull out the ol' notebook. PCTEL's WiFi Seeker seems to succeed where previous devices have failed. Read our Quick View review and see if you agree!

Draytek Vigor 2900g Broadband Security Router Reviewed

How much would you pay for a four-point SPI router with 802.11g access point, USB print server and built-in VPN endpoint? If you think about $200 is too much, would you change your mind if it handled LAN-LAN and Remote-LAN PPTP, IPsec and L2TP VPN tunnels on both the wired and wireless sides? And how about if it threw in VLAN and Bandwidth control? Come read our review to see how Draytek's Vigor 2900g Broadband Security Router does it all.

Linksys WRT54GS Wireless-G Broadband Router with SpeedBooster Reviewed

The empire strikes back in the "enhanced" 802.11g wars! Linksys has introduced its first SpeedBooster products fueled by Broadcom's Afterburner technology. We rushed the WRT54GS Wireless-G Router with SpeedBooster onto our test bench and have the first-available in-depth review. How does Afterburner stack up against Super-G? Does more money really buy you more performance? All this and more will be revealed...

ASUS WL-330 Pocket Wireless Access Point reviewed

At first glance, you might dismiss ASUS' tiny WL-330 as a wireless toy, but you'd be wrong. This mighty-mite packs good performance, WDS bridging / repeating and Ethernet-to-wireless adapter capabilities into a package that's sure to lend itself to some creative uses.

3Com OfficeConnect Wireless Cable/DSL Gateway reviewed

Like every other networking product vendor, 3Com has had a tough time during the past few years. We took a look at its OfficeConnect Wireless 11g Cable/DSL Gateway and companion PC Card, and were left wondering where 3Com's spirit of innovation has gone...

AirMagnet Handheld 3.0 and Laptop Trio reviewed

AirMagnet's wireless LAN analysis products have consistently gotten good marks from reviewers since their debut almost two years ago. We finally got our hands on the latest versions of the Handheld and Laptop Trio products and have to agree... we liked them too!

Enhanced 802.11g NeedToKnow

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One of the wireless networking stories at this year's Las Vegas CES - aside from the scads of networkable DVD players and "media adapters" - was the battle for bragging rights to the highest throughput "starburst" number. (The "starburst" is the number prominently displayed on the front of a product's box).

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