Like every other website on the planet, SmallNetBuilder uses cookies. Our cookies track login status, but we only allow admins to log in anyway, so those don't apply to you. Any other cookies you pick up during your visit come from advertisers, which we don't control.
If you continue to use the site, you agree to tolerate our use of cookies. Thank you!

Wi-Fi Router Charts

Click for Wi-Fi Router Charts

Mesh System Charts

Click for Wi-Fi Mesh System Charts

Wireless Performance

The RTA1750 is not Wi-Fi Certified (Amped has not Wi-Fi Certified any of its products.) It was tested using the Revision 8 Wireless test process with 2.0.8 firmware loaded. The router comes with WPS enabled. I connected a Windows 8.1 notebook to the router's 5 GHz SSID and was prompted for WPS PIN with a pushbutton alternative. A pushbutton session quickly resulted in a WPA2/AES connection. WPS has settings pages for both radios and can be disabled.

The router defaults to unique SSIDs and auto channel select for each radio and 80 MHz bandwidth for 5 GHz and 40 MHz bandwidth for 2.4 GHz.

For performance testing, the router was first reset to factory defaults. The 2.4 GHz radio was set to Channel 6 and 20 MHz only bandwidth mode. The 5 GHz radio was set to Channel 153 and left in 80 MHz channel width to enable 802.11ac link rates. The NETGEAR R7000 bridge mode standard test client was connected using WPA2/AES encryption.

Our standard practice is to center the router under test's antennas on the turntable, both front-to-back and side-to-side in the chamber. This method is intended to keep maximum distance between the router under test and chamber antennas as the router rotates during test. The photo below shows the RTA1750 in the test chamber in its starting test position.

RTA1750 in test chamber

RTA1750 in test chamber

The Benchmark Summary below shows the average of all wireless throughput measurements made over the tested attenuation range.

Amped Wireless RTA1750 Benchmark Summary

Amped Wireless RTA1750 Benchmark Summary

I chose #1 and #2 ranked AC1750 routers for comparison, which are currently the TP-LINK Archer C8 and ASUS RT-AC66U. The ASUS actually is tied for #2 with Securifi's Almond+ router. But since we haven't reviewed the Almond+ yet, I left it out of the comparison.

2.4 GHz downlink performance shows the RTA1750 distinguishing itself by staying under the other two routers' curves throughout the tested range. It also disconnected after the 57 dB attenuation test, indicating poorer range performance than the ASUS.

2.4 GHz Downlink Throughput vs. Attenuation

2.4 GHz Downlink Throughput vs. Attenuation

2.4 GHz uplink shows the ASUS as the clear winner for most of the test range, while the TP-LINK and Amped products are pretty well matched.

2.4 GHz Uplink Throughput vs. Attenuation

2.4 GHz Uplink Throughput vs. Attenuation

Performance spreads out in the 5 GHz downlink profile. This time, the ASUS is the first to lose connection, with the Amped and TP-LINK routers staying connected out to the 39 dB test. But the RTA1750 has lower throughput than the other two products throughout most of its range.

5 GHz Downlink Throughput vs. Attenuation

5 GHz Downlink Throughput vs. Attenuation

5 GHz uplink shows all three products pretty evenly matched. The Archer C8 has higher starting throughput than the other two products and ties the Amped for staying connected the longest.

5 GHz Uplink Throughput vs. Attenuation

5 GHz Uplink Throughput vs. Attenuation

To put all this into perspective, I turned to the Router Ranker Performance Summary and included the TP-LINK Archer C7 V2, which also tied for #3 ranking. Comparing the two shows there is more than one way to get a #3 ranking!

Ranker Performance Summary Comparison

Ranker Performance Summary Comparison

Closing Thoughts

At $180, the Amped Wireless RTA1750 is one of the, if not the most expensive AC1750 class routers you can buy. But I don't think it would be money well spent. It only runs with the pack on wireless uplink performance on both bands and significantly underperforms on downlink throughput, including losing connection at the same time or before much lower priced competitors. And while its simultaneous routing throughput is chart-topping, its USB storage sharing throughput is embarrasingly low.

In the end, Amped Wireless products may have more amplifiers than other Wi-Fi gear. But, at least by our measurements, they don't deliver on Amped's "3X the range of other routers" claim.

Support Us!

If you like what we do and want to thank us, just buy something on Amazon. We'll get a small commission on anything you buy. Thanks!

Don't Miss These

  • 1
  • 2