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Wi-Fi Router Charts

Click for Wi-Fi Router Charts

Mesh System Charts

Click for Wi-Fi Mesh System Charts

Routing Benchmark Results

The Revision 11 test process was used to test all products.

Today's routers are all capable of wire-speed gigabit throughput. Any differences you see in results are more due to test process variation than product performance. Keep in mind the best you'd ever see in this benchmark would be ~ 944 Mbps, not 1000 Mbps, due to TCP/IP overhead. I wouldn't attach any significance to the differences in the results below.

Routing throughput results

Routing throughput results

Routing latency scores (higher is better) are shown below. Converting back to latency (latency = 1/(score/1000) (lower is better) yields about 19 ms for the AX20, 22 ms for the AX10 and 25 ms for the NETGEAR; all pretty respectable.

Routing latency results

Routing latency scores

Wi-Fi Throughput

Although our focus is on sub-$100 products, I decided to include two other two-stream products that didn't make the $100 cutoff in the performance comparison. The NETGEAR RAX40 is a dual-band dual-stream full Wi-Fi 6 router based on Intel's Lantiq platform. It currently sells for $122 on Amazon.

I also pulled ASUS' RT-AX56U into the mix that, like the NETGEAR RAX20 and TP-Link AX20, is built on Broadcom's BCM6755. ASUS wants a premium for the AX56U, however, with current Amazon pricing at $133.

Because the screenshots that included all the throughput number tables ran really long, just the plots will be shown. Click on the links to pull up the Charts page that will include all the data.

The 2.4 GHz downlink plot shows the effect of 2X higher top link rate in the products with AX 2.4 GHz radios. The exception is the Archer AX20, which has something funky going on in rate adaptation at the higher signal levels (lower attenuations). I ran the test multiple times, with similar results.

2.4 GHz throughput vs. attenuation - downlink

2.4 GHz throughput vs. attenuation - downlink

The 2.4 GHz uplink plot shows the Archer AX10's throughput is again limited by its lower maximum link rate. But this time, the Archer AX20 behaves more like it should, albeit at the bottom of the pack.

2.4 GHz throughput vs. attenuation - uplink

2.4 GHz throughput vs. attenuation - uplink

The 5 GHz downlink plot shows remarkably different results for the BCM6755-powered routers (RAX20, Archer AX20 and ASUS RT-AX56U). This time both Archers have higher signal level funkiness going on at relatively high signal levels. The NETGEAR RAX20 and ASUS RT-AX56U, along with the Intel-powered NETGEAR RAX40, all start out with very similar throughput. But only the ASUS maintains it longer than the others. Among the sub-$100 routers, the NETGEAR RAX20 is the best of the bunch.

5 GHz throughput vs. attenuation - downlink

5 GHz throughput vs. attenuation - downlink

5 GHz uplink shows the ASUS and RAX40 again running neck-and-neck, but with the NETGEAR in the lead this time.

5 GHz throughput vs. attenuation - uplink

5 GHz throughput vs. attenuation - uplink

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